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Not very well thought out that one; tell me when exactly do you propose to stop concreting over England? There are already whole areas of the country that are no longer ethnically or culturally English. At what point do you propose to draw a line, if at all?

The absorption of manageable numbers is one thing; the wholesale ethnic clearance of predominantly working class areas is quite another. Be under no illusion, it IS the voiceless, white working class who pay to enable you to bask in the comforting sense of your own goodness. There is novsuch thing as vicarious charity.

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Little Rishi Shoetax is the WEF's first choice for net zero Greta Charles growth, continued open borders, clot shots and social credit and digital currency Armageddon.... and if we are lucky we'll get there on a diet of insects and oat milk whilst riding Chinese scooters and bicycles.

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Interesting take on the man. I disagree about his walking on water during the pandemic, though. What he did was to inflict untold ongoing debt on people who mainly struggle to understand the concept. We've become a nation that swims in debt, so we can have everything we want just when we want it. The young folk who are going to pick up the eventual tab for this seem the most blithely unaware of what's coming down the pike.

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Nov 3, 2022Liked by James

I read the "walking on water" thing as a comment on his public popularity rather than his astute decision-making.

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Yes this was the intention - it was a comment about his public perception.

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I agree. It's possible nowadays to be popular even after having ballsed-up the future for our younger generations, because the majority live within the white noise of social media and still trust the BBC. Lambs to the slaughter...

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Don't you think that the circumstances of 2020 were desperate times which called for desperate measures? Nobody blames Winston Churchill for the debt accrued during WWII.

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They were desperate times for a number of (thus far) unexplained reasons.

The media went full-tilt with 'we're all gonna die!' despite the Diamond Princess demonstrating how unlikely that was. The usual extended period for vaccine testing were telescoped by something like 10 times, the trials were compromised by vaxxing the control groups, Pfizer data has since been subjected to scorn, but why weren't the competent authorities on top of such anomalies? Why did the CDC and various governments tell us that getting jabbed would save our lives and protect granny when they did not know this to be true? Why did 'safe and effective' vaccines require full indemnity for their manufacturers? Why did the word 'vaccine' require redefinition, except to encourage hesitant folk to take an experimental drug licensed only for 'emergency use'?

The 'desperate times' to which you allude were concocted via the fear-porn circulated by governments and the MSM. Any sort of reasoned consideration was left entirely to those sceptical enough to look at the bigger picture.

As for the Churchill reference, there's a sizeable gap between an undisputable World War and a virus that didn't prove that fatal to a cruise ship full of less-than-fit old folk. The first was understandable, the second somewhat incredible.

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More people arriving will require the provision of more accommodation. Fewer people arriving will mean that less is required. You are either deliberately peddling falsehoods or you have severe cognitive difficulties. Which is it?

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Nov 3, 2022Liked by James

Then let's build loads of houses, using the freshly-arrived labour to get them built. The problem is also the solution.

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I appreciate you're coming at this from a Conservative perspective, but I still think Suank's biggest problem is "does the public still want a Conservative government after such a long period of uncertainty, stagnation, and the general crumbling of the public realm?" The disastrous Truss interregnum feels like a tipping point. I'm not sure there's a lot any Conservative leader could do at this point to turn things around either economically or electorally.

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Major said of the 1992 Tory election victory that the outcome 'stretched the democratic elastic too far.' Certainly from now onwards it's swimming against the tide. But voting among the young has collapsed - meaning if you can keep the remaining electorate on side with rising house prices, pensions etc., that's a very powerful Tory-aligned coalition of voters.

However, that does mean the big open danger is on health and social care outcomes (they won't be happy if these services get much worse.) Which probably means more taxes on the working age young to fund these spending requirements, given wealth taxes are so despised by even the non-wealthy...

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When the youth vote (and "youth" here means "under-50s") is in single figures, you simply can't make up the shortfall among the elderly.

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